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Read about the latest tips and trends that will help you secure the perfect job.

 

Multitasking is very much ingrained in our lives thanks to technology, social media and the internet. We are constantly distracted and expected to move quickly from one task to the next and back again. You may think you are great at multitasking but something always has to give and inevitably you end up giving attention to one task more than the other.

Congratulations you’ve made it through to round two of interviews. Now what!?

 

You had a great first interview, found out more about the role and now you really, really want this job! It can be both daunting and exciting going for your second interview, so how do you nail it and leave a lasting impression?

 

“Strive not for success. But rather to be of value” Albert Einstein

 

Being an integral part of your company is so important, as is achieving your goals. Success follows when you demonstrate value in your role. Value is the relevant worth or importance you can give to your work and others. You may have a specific skill that is unique to your role which is highly regarded in the team.

So why aim for Value?

“The most notable fact our culture imprints on women is the sense of our limits.  The most important thing one woman can do for another is to illuminate and expand her sense of actual possibilities” – Adrienne Rich

 

On the 8th of March, 1908 15,000 women gathered in New York to march for women’s working rights, previously known as International Working Women’s Day. Today we call this day International Women’s Day. Nearly 110 years has passed since this march for women’s rights. As women we have came along way, but we still have a long way to go!

Once you have been selected for an interview, it can be an exciting and challenging time. It means you have passed the first stage of the recruitment process with a successful CV and cover letter.

Many candidates experience nerves throughout the interview process and there are a few quick tips you can apply to calm the butterflies in your stomach.

1. Research the company

Do you really love what you do?

 

Do you wake up on a Monday morning excited for the work week ahead and ready for new opportunities?

Is your job challenging and rewarding?

If you answered yes, that’s great! You are part of the small percentage of people who love what they do. These people have found the perfect role that satisfies their professional, financial and personal aspirations.

A Winning Approach In The War For Talent

Attracting and retaining talent is a key requirement for any successful business. Now, more than ever, it makes financial sense too as the true cost of turnover is calculated with lost productivity, training and recruitment costs.

A 2014 survey found that a well-crafted and authentic Employee Value Proposition (EVP) delivered the following benefits:

Have you been thinking about returning to work?

Is your maternity leave almost over or are the kids getting to the age where full time school is just around the corner?  You’ve decided it’s time to get back into the workforce once again or even for the first time in your career.

The decision to return to work doesn’t have to be stressful. There are workplaces ready to welcome you and discuss flexible working arrangements which can be very exciting!

From one mum to another, here are some pros to returning to work:

Top tips on performance reviews for career growth and development

Conducting your own personal performance review prior to arranging a meeting with your manager allows you to effectively map out your achievements as well as analyse the areas for improvement. Identifying where you have added value helps your manager see the contribution you have made to the business and assists them in developing appropriate rewards, training and development opportunities.

Why your EVP is more than just perks and office parties

For many organisations ‘company culture’ is a buzzword, or something promoted by the HR department. Now, according to a 2015 report by Deloitte, it is one of the most common challenges in the world’s workforce, with only 13% of the global workforce identified as being ‘highly engaged’.

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